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There is no certainty or clear consensus as to whether RNA vaccines may have DNA altering properties.


Conventional vaccines often use "weakened"  or "killed"  versions of a virus. That means laboratories have to produce huge amounts of the virus. They often also include a protein, which is needed to spark a human immune response. But producing a virus and a viral-protein can be time-intensive and expensive. 

A DNA  or RNA  vaccine, on the other hand, takes a small part of the virus' own genetic information — just enough to spark an immune response — and the protein can be produced directly at the cell. Experts say the virus' genetic information can be replicated and produced relatively easily. And that's what scientists want in a live situation, such as the SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 pandemic, where billions of people need protection very quickly.

One of the important question that arise related to the safeness of RNA vaccines is: Do they alter the DNA of the organism in which they are injected?


Sources

https://www.dw.com/en/whats-the-science-on-dna-and-rna-vaccines/a-54097063


ASSERTION

There is no certainty or clear consensus as to whether RNA vaccines may have DNA altering properties.

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